the Custom Loaf™ Troubleshooting

Adjustments that can be made.

Recipes other then those in the instruction book.

The Custom Loaf™ recipes are sized so that the dough is kneaded properly and the finished bread loaf does not exceed the Baking Pan capacity. Yes, other recipes can be used, but ensure that only recipes with similar quantities of ingredients are used. As a general guide, a minimum of 2 cups and a maximum of 4.5 cups of total dry ingredients is recommended on the bread settings and 3 cups of fruit on the jam setting.

Ingredient substitutes.

Some products can be substituted in the recipes with a little alteration to make them work. Powdered eggs, dried butter milk or milk can be substituted in. These work well with the delay start feature as we do not recommend using this feature with fresh milk, eggs or any other perishable ingredients with the delay start. Always ensure to add the water to the bread pan first and then add the dried substituted ingredients after the flour to keep them separate. Fresh milk and eggs can be substituted in on recipes recommending the dried equivalents. Please note that the bread will have a heavier texture when this type of substitution is made. Also decrease the same amount of liquid equal to the amount of fresh milk added and omit the milk powder. Butter or margarine can be used instead of oil as well in equivalent amounts but the crust of the bread will be more creamy and yellow in color. If looking to substitute the regular sugar, brown sugar can be added as well as honey, golden syrup, or sweet liquids. However, in the case of the sweet liquids, honey or golden syrup, the measurement of other liquids must be decreased by the same measurement of the liquid substitute being added. We do not recommend omitting the salt in the recipes as the salt actually helps with water retention in the dough, the strength of the gluten development and the fermentation of the yeast. Salt can also improve the loaf shape, crumb structure, shelf life and crust color of the finished loaf. Home-Ground or Home-Milled flour can be used depending on the coarseness of the flour. If these are desired, it’s recommended that the flour is not too coarse and that a blend of the home-milled or home-ground and bread flour be used.

Temperatures

Room and Water temperature are very important to the yeast in the bread. If the water is too hot and it will kill the yeast, too cold and it would allow the yeast to develop. We suggest that all dry ingredients be at room temperature and the base liquids (aside from perishable liquids) be at 80°F (27°C). Average room temperature is between 68°F and 77°F (20°C – 25°C). If the temperature of the room is too hot, the bread maker can overheat during the baking function. Too cold and it may struggle to get up to the proper baking temperature. That being said, the bake temperature may seem a bit low if measuring it. Due to the small enclosed baking chamber and the close proximity of the heating elements, the baking temperatures are lower then most ovens but hot enough to bake the bread efficiently. Our testing has shown that breads bake well in regular ovens at about 357°F (190°C) but can be successfully baked in the Custom Loaf™ at right around 300°F (150°C).

Altitude and Weather Adjustments

Dough tends to rise faster as there is less air pressure when the altitude is over 3000 feet or if the climate is very humid. Reduce the yeast by 1/4 of a teaspoon at the start. It may be that the dough still rises too much. If so adjust again by reducing 1/4 of a teaspoon the next time the recipe is used. Flour is drier at that elevation and in drier climates and will absorb more liquid. Adjust liquid OR flour amounts by 1 tablespoon (add in tablespoon of water or remove 1 tablespoon of flour) to adjust the recipe.

Common Issues

There are a few common issues that can occur with the bread being made that have simple solutions.

    There is no movement in the Bread Pan.

  • If the paddle in the Baking Pan is not assembled correctly and seated fully on the mount in the center of the Baking Pan the paddle will not move.
  • If the machine is in the ‘Keep Warm’ phase or the ‘Preheat’ phase there is no movement of the paddle in the Bread Pan.
  • If the lid is open during any phase where the paddle should be moving, it will stop.
  • If the LCD displays the ‘—H’, ‘-H’ codes then there is an issue with the ambient temperature and the temperature that the machine is reading internally. The ‘H’ codes mean that the baking chamber (either from recent previous use or just the ambient temperature0 is too warm and the machine will not operate until it is cooled by opening the lid, removing the bread pan and leaving unplugged for about 30 minutes.
  • If the ‘–L’ code shows on the display then there is an issue with the ambient temperature and the temperature that the machine is reading internally. The ‘L’ code means that the baking chamber is too cold and will not operate until it heats up. The ambient temperature of the room is significant enough that the machine can not heat efficiently. Moving the machine to a warmer room, 70° to 77° degrees will allow the machine to warm and the code should clear quickly.

    The loaf is damp or sticky.

  • If the bread is left in the Bread Maker for the entire length of the ‘Keep Warm’ phase, there is every chance that the loaf will be a bit damp and sticky from the moisture that can come about from steam releasing from the loaf. Simply remove the Baking Pan at the start of the ‘Keep Warm’ phase, remove the bread from the pan and allow to cool on a wire rack.
  • If the bread is sliced immediately after baking, the loaf will seem damp and sticky as the steam has not had a chance to be released from the loaf. It is recommended that the bread be allowed to cool for about 20 minutes at least before slicing.
  • If too much water has been added to the ingredients it can cause the resulting loaf to be damp and sticky as well. It is recommended that the next time the recipe is used, increase the amount of flour by 1 tablespoon.

    The loaf has risen too high.

  • If there is too much water has been added to the ingredients, the bread loaf can rise too high. It is recommended that the next time the recipe is used, increase the amount of flour by 1 tablespoon.
  • If too much yeast is added to the ingredients, the bread loaf can rise too high as well. It is recommended that the next time the recipe is used, decrease the amount of yeast by 1/4 of a teaspoon.
  • If the wrong type of yeast is used, the loaf can rise too high. All standard recipes require Active Dry Yeast and the rapid recipes require Instant Yeast.
  • If non recommended ingredients or quantities are used, there can be several differences in the loaf including that it will rise too high. Always use the recommended ingredients, substitutions and quantities stated in the recipes.

    The loaf rises correctly but then falls.

  • If there is too much water added to the ingredients, the bread loaf may seem to be rising correctly but then falls. If this is seen, during the ‘knead 2′ phase, add in 1 tablespoon of flour and this should be corrected.
  • If too much yeast is added to the ingredients, the bread can fall as well. To correct this, the next time the recipe is used, reduce the yeast amount by 1/4 of a teaspoon.
  • f non recommended ingredients or quantities are used, there can be several differences in the loaf including that it will fall. Always use the recommended ingredients, substitutions and quantities stated in the recipes.

    The loaf is short and dense.

  • If the lid is opened during the baking phase, the resulting loaf may be short and dense. It is recommended that the lid not be lifted during operation unless checking consistency, adding a glaze or adding seeds to the top of the loaf.
  • If the dough does not have enough moisture, either due to there being too much flour or too little water, the resulting loaf may be shorter and denser then intended. If the dough looks to not be rising enough, during the ‘knead 2′ phase, add in 1 tablespoon of water and the problem should be corrected.
  • If the temperature of the water added to the ingredients is too hot or too cold, the resulting loaf may be shorter and denser then intended as well. The water added to the ingredients should be right around 80°F (27°C) unless the recipe states otherwise.
  • If the wrong type of flour is being used the denseness can be increased and the height decreased in the resulting bread. Check the recipe for the correct type of flour to use. As a guide, only flour with a protein percentage between 11% and 12% should be used.
  • If the yeast is the incorrect type, there is not enough yeast, the yeast is stale or prematurely activates, the bread will be short and dense. Most of the standard recipes require Active Dry Yeast with the rapid recipes requiring Instant Yeast. Always use only the recommended type stated in the recipe. If the type is fine, check the ‘Best Before Date’ on the yeast container. If the yeast is fresh and the type is correct, next time the recipe is used, increase the amount by 1/4 of a teaspoon. To avoid prematurely activating the yeast, make sure that the ingredients are layered in the order they appear in the recipe with liquids going in first. When using the ‘Delay Start’ feature, make a small hollow or dent in the flour mounded on top of the other ingredients. Place the yeast in the hollow or dent, making sure that the dent is not deep enough to tough the water, salt, or sugar layers.
  • If there is not enough sugar the resulting loaf can be short and dense too. The sugar feeds the yeast, making it expand to create the light springy loaf generally looked for. If there is not enough ‘food’ the yeast won’t be able to create that desired texture. Is it not recommended that powdered or liquid sweeteners are substituted in the recipe. Next time the recipe is used, make sure to follow the directions for sugar content carefully.
  • If non recommended ingredients or quantities are used, there can be several differences in the loaf including that it will be short and dense. Always use the recommended ingredients, substitutions and quantities stated in the recipes.

Flour sometimes sticks to the bread or bread pan.

During the ‘Knead’ phase, small amounts of flour may sometimes stick to the sides of the bread pan and bake onto the sides of the loaf. Scrape the floured portion from the outer crust with a sharp knife. The next time a loaf is made, if necessary, during the ‘knead 2′ phase, use a rubber spatula to fold in any unmixed flour from around the edges of the bread pan. This is especially important on the GLUTEN FREE and YEAST FREE settings. You may want to spray the bottom and halfway up the sides of the bread pan with cooking oil before adding ingredients for the yeast free breads and use a rubber spatula to loosen the loaf before turning out.

The Collapsible Paddle will not collapse.

The collapsible paddle is designed to move easily from laying down to standing upright. If there should be any issues with that ease of movement, please take a careful look at the slight gap left for the hinge to swing the paddle from one position to another. Occasionally dough can become caught in that gap and, if allowed to dry and harden, can act like glue, keeping the hinge locked in one position or the other. It’s very important that the opening for the drive shaft in the middle of both paddles and the hinge area on the collapsible paddle be cleaned thoroughly after every use. A soft bristled toothbrush can work wonders in the hinge to move out any left over bread or dough and a narrow bottle brush can gently but thoroughly clean out that center drive shaft area. Please refer to Care for a more complete list of care and maintenance instructions.

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